Movies

For the 8th consecutive year, the Athens Ethnographic Film Festival – Ethnofest returns to cine Astor, presenting exciting ethnographic films from all over the world. Among others, this year’s edition consists of two special screenings – John Marshall’s “The Hunters” and the participatory documentary “The Maribor Uprisings” by Maple Razsa and Milton Guillén – interesting side-events, panels and open discussions, educational activities and a masterclass.

The 8th Ethnofest will also present a themed section entitled “Labour and Precarity”, curated by anthropologists Dimitra Kofti (Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology) and Mao Mollona (Goldsmiths College, University of London), as well as the themed section “Man and the Environment”, curated by Alexis Katsaros, member of the organization MedINA, and Calliope Stara, post-doc researcher at the University of Ioannina. The themed section “Man and the Environment” is being organized in collaboration with the Directorate of Modern Cultural Assets and Intangible Cultural Heritage.

Last but not least, the 8th Ethnofest will inaugurate a new section, called “Greek Ethnographies”. This section will present films that explore and reflect upon social and cultural practices in Greece through the ethnographic lens.

The tribute entitled “Man and the Environment” is implemented by the Operational Program “Human Resources Development, Education and Lifelong Learning” and its co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund) and Greek National Funds. The film tribute has free admission and it’s accessible to disabled people.

8th Athens Ethnographic Film Festival – Ethnofest
22-26 November
Astor Cinema (28 Stadiou str., entrance through Stoa Korai / near Panepistimio Metro station)
Ticket Prices:
Screening slot: 2 euros
All-day pass: 5 euros
10-screening pass: 10 euros
Free entrance for all side-events
Free entrance for students and unemployment card holders

 

Download the full programme

Curators: Alexis Katsaros (MedINA), Calliope Stara (University of Ioannina)

The past decades have been marked by rapid and fundamental changes in the everyday life of rural and mountain communities and in the management of natural resources, with multiple implications for the environment, social structures and land use. On the one hand, the ongoing process of urbanization has inevitably contributed to the gradual and at times full abandonment of inland locations -especially mountainous areas- and islands.  On the other hand, the predominant model of economic growth has been -and still is- largely based on the uncontrolled exploitation of natural resources, with no particular concern in preventing or mitigating environmental impacts and landscape degradation nor with sustaining cultural heritage and quality of life in the long term.

Against these complex issues, alternative approaches have emerged that promote the values ​​of sustainability and quality of life in an ‘idyllic’ cultural and natural environment that presents itself as a response to the shortfalls of urbanization and gives particular emphasis to the dynamics of local communities and participative ways of management and governance. To what extent can such attempts of ‘selective emigration to the countryside’ combined with modern needs, technological advances, new ways of thinking, creativity and focused action help us shape a different future?

 

The tribute entitled “Man and the Environment” is implemented by the Operational Program “Human Resources Development, Education and Lifelong Learning” and its co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund) and Greek National Funds. The film tribute has free admission and it’s accessible to disabled people.

 

In an era of deepening precarity and deregulation of work, this themed section of Ethnofest is dedicated to films on labour, attempting to critically reflect on the relationships between film processes, aesthetics and the politics of representation. Through a review of contemporary visual approaches to labour, the section engages with questions, such as: How can processes of filmmaking cast a critical light on different forms of material and immaterial labour? What insights can films on labour bring on the dynamics of contemporary capitalism? The films of the section include visual approaches to labour, precarity, unemployment, unpaid work, job-seeking and migration. They also include issues of employment inequalities, inclusions and exclusions through labour and their intertwinement with relations of gender, ethnicity and age.

Based on an open call for films engaging with an ethnographic gaze, including documentary, docufiction, participatory and other artistic forms of filmmaking, the programme includes different contemporary filmic approaches to work, in a wide context both in terms of production and geographically: conditions of exhaustion in shopping malls in Italy (“Life in the Mall”), in a wasteland of electronics in Ghana, where millions of devices converge from all over the world (“E-wasteland”), migratory narratives and desires for family reconnections by Ukrainian migrants (“Road of a migrant”), mass production in China (“Long yearning”), a workers’ cooperative at a bankrupted factory (VIOME) in Thessaloniki (Next stop: Utopia), histories of political tensions and resistances in factories in Cairo, as presented by a workers’ acting laboratory (“Out in the Streets”). The themed section is curated by Dimitra Kofti (Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology) and Mao Mollona (Goldsmiths College, University of London).

On this section, the Athens Ethnographic Film Festival presents films that explore and reflect upon the social and cultural practices in Greece through the ethnographic lens.

AMA-SAN
2016
Japan / Switzerland / Portugal

A selection of films that were produced by Summer School students. The Summer School is being co-organized by Ethnofest and the Netherlands Insitute at Athens (NIA).

Program

22/11Wednesday
20:00
Panorama
Directed by: David Bert Joris Dhert. 61' (Belgium)

What roads did the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Rio Olympic Games pave for Brazil? Along three years of navigating through the daily lives of three Brazilians living in Rio de Janeiro, one indigenous descendant, one African descendant and one European descendant, the documentary We Must Be Dreaming explores on a personal level what the World Cup and the Olympic Games have actually meant for the lives of the people of Rio de Janeiro and tο what degree the two biggest sport events of the planet have brought the dreams and opportunities that they promised.

23/11Thursday
17:00
Filming Labour and Precarity
Directed by: Koštana Banović. 3' (The Netherlands)

One day at the cigar factory in Sao Felix, Brazil. Women and tobacco leaves.

17:00
Filming Labour and Precarity
Directed by: Nikos Gkoulios. 14' (Greece)

We the Others is a short fiction film about the last day at work for a 50 year old warehouser of a multinational company. He agrees with his signature on his dismissal and continues his last shift. They send him to decorate a school feast.

17:00
Filming Labour and Precarity
Directed by: Nicola Zambelli, Fabio Ferrero. 75' (Italy)

Alice and Beatrice, two friends, both female employees in a shopping center, going through a crucial time in their lives. In the world of commerce, the 24/7 business model was firmly established following the liberalization of opening hours of shops; the new labor contracts no longer provide the distinction between working days and holidays, altering the balance between life and work. The documentary arises from the need to show the transformation of the familiar world starting from a reflection on the work of women in shopping centers, a constant presence in the urban periphery and resource employment for young jobseekers.

18:45
Special Screenings
Directed by: Despoina Kalogianni, Aria Saridi. 10' (Greece)

It could be a man or a book hero. However, it is a little coffeeshop in Keramikos area. Τhe film follows the everyday routine of the people who have their morning coffee at the coffeeshop. This everyday ritual unravels on the tables, in the cups, the backgammon, the conversation and the sound of silence. During two weeks of filming, this everyday routine is being depicting at the screen and we see the people become familiar with the camera, which ends up being nothing more than an observer. The film was produced at the Department of Communication and Media (University of Athens) within the context of the module “Film and Documentary Production” during winter semester 2016-2017 (taught by Maria Komninou and Nikos Myrtou).

18:45
Special Screenings
Directed by: Niovi Andrioti, Evaggelia Vassilopoulou, Charalambos Drousiotis, Theodoros Panagopoulos. 11' (Greece)

The film follows the everyday ritual of mr Apostolis and his antique shop in Monastiraki. He starts his day at 6 am, a lot earlier than the other shops of the area. He talks about financial difficulties, his cat companions and the past, when he was travelling across Europe. In a small alley, he has created a space that allows him to exist in a different time and to keep his memories intact. He calls is “Polyploubo”, a name found by Homer’s Iliad. The film was produced at the Department of Communication and Media, University of Athens, within the context of the module “Film and Documentary Production” during winter semester 2016-2017 (taught by Maria Komninou and Nikos Myrtou).

18:45
Special Screenings
Directed by: Aggelos Kladis, Polyxeni Fotopoulou. 10' (Greece)

The metronom is a guide for the musician. The film follows Christina, a young woman who plays the classical drums. She goes to the Conservatoire, she studies at home, takes little breaks, she has to be consistent, she feels torn by dilemmas, she feels the stress and the pressure and, finally she feels relieved as she releases this pressure and feels the fulfillment of music that brings her closer to her goals and gives shape to her energy. The film was produced at the Department of Communication and Media,, Univesity of Athens within the context of the module “Film and Documentary Production” during winter semester 2016-2017 (taught by Maria Komninou and Nikos Myrtou).

19:45
Man and the Environment
Directed by: Silas Michalakas, Yiannis N. Drinis. 30' (Greece)

Main aim of the film is to detect the transformations of the traditional ritual taking place on the annual Saint George’s (Aiyioris) day in the village of Nestani. Very early in the morning the participants in the ritual wearing traditional costumes and bearing poles adorned with flowers and wild celery walk to the outlying church of Aiyioris, situated at spot elevation 1280 meters above sea levels, on a steep rock that dominates the landscape. Over there, at the threshing floor of the Ai-Yioris, they sing traditional folk songs that could be regarded as an oral archive of the community’s history and collective experience and they keep up walking down the hill to Nestani.

20:45
Greek Ethnographies
Directed by: Spyros Gerousis. 57' (Greece)

Every Single Day deals with the parallel stories of 3+1 people that made their first contact with hiphop in 90’s Greece, recording their experiential narrations within a society that was changing day by day, year by year. The film uses examples coming from the everyday lives of its subjects to re-tell the country’s story from the economic boom of the ’90s to the present’s devastating financial crisis. Its filmic innovation lies in the fact that it uses elements of the hip hop culture to create alternative narratives that complete or contrast the mainstream ones. The film contextualises the culture’s practices in an ethnographic manner by presenting the day-to-day dimensions of the greek hip hop scene, drawing it’s citations from the streets where it was born.

22:15
Panorama
Directed by: Yuebai Liu, Matteo Primiterra. 16' (Italy)

Huáyì is a colletion of appunti that attempts to give voice to a new generation of Italians, young Chinese that grew up in different Italian contexts and forced to confront the question of self and identity. The film captures fragments of stories that tell us of young men and women stuck between three worlds: one to which their parents belonged to, Italy in which they grew up and contemporary China, which they struggle to understand.

Screened at MUDEC Milan for DocuCity 2017 and EPIC Montréal 2017.

22:15
Panorama
Directed by: Martin Gruber, Frank Seidel. 52' (Germany, ΗΠΑ)

An anthropologist and a linguist from Germany are trying to understand a ritual, taking place in a small village on the coast of Guinea, West Africa. They are told that two seemingly conflicting ceremonies take place during a four-day event commemorating a recently deceased woman: a Muslim celebration of the 40th day after death conducted by a local Imam, and the Mkisaata ritual, performed by the members of a Nalu female secret society in honour of its deceased member. As the involved men explain the filmmakers their respective version of the events, the researchers get increasingly drawn into the ritual by the women of the secret society and become part of their performance.

24/11Friday
14:00
Special Screenings
Directed by: Maple Razsa, Milton Guillén. 90' (Slovenia, ΗΠΑ)

In the once prosperous industrial city of Maribor, Slovenia, anger over political corruption became unruly revolt. In The Maribor Uprisings—part film, part conversation, and part interactive experiment—you are invited to participate in the protests. Dramatic frontline footage from a video activist collective places you in Maribor as crowds surround and ransack City Hall under a hailstorm of tear gas canisters. As a viewer, you must decide collectively with your fellow audience members which cameras you will follow and therefore how the screening will unfold. Like those who joined the actual uprisings, you will be faced with the choice of joining non-violent protests or following rowdy crowds towards City Hall and greater conflict.

16:00
Student Films
Directed by: Diane Agatha. 19' (United Kingdom, Switzerland)

Undercover in Underwear is an auto-ethnographic short film that incites reflection around desire, desirability, and new ways of understanding entrepreneurship in digital adult entertainment. The Internet provides an infinite place of freedom where self, mind and body are dislocated. We are able to reinvent and present ourselves the way we want. It is in this world that Circle, the filmmakers alter ego, was born. This film is the result of a journey, exploring and embracing desire, while reflecting on representations of female sexuality in the era of the Web 2.0. The film shows different points of view at play: the viewer, the performer, the audience and the anthropologist, in an attempt to abolish stereotypes.

16:00
Student Films
Directed by: Lise Zurné. 29' (The Netherlands, Ινδονησία)

Each year on the 1st of March, a historical society called the Komunitas Djokjakarta 1945 re-enacts one of the last battles with the Dutch colonizers of 1949 in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Following their preparations, this film seeks to portray this community and its main members and explores why these men are so interested in re-enacting the past. Focusing on the material culture of re-enactment, this film shows how these people create their own spectacular and romanticized re-presentation of the past that allows them to temporarily be the war heroes that they worship so much.

16:00
Student Films
Directed by: Mara Lin Visser. 36' (The Netherlands)

Unity: Dress-scapes of Accra is an ethnographic film about African fashion in the capital of Ghana. While following Allan, a fashion designer, and his wife, Cynthia, this mosaic film shows the great diversity of tailor-made fashion and hybrid styles; the ways the African wear is used and the expression of culture by wearing the African prints. The film gives an interesting overview of dress-scapes in Accra, but also highlights beautiful details by focusing on a few participants who show the mixture of different materials, cuts and styles in a creative and free atmosphere. In this way the film is not only observational, it gives people space to tell their story and show their African pride.

16:00
Student Films
Directed by: Karen Waltorp. 30' (Denmark)

The main protagonists are two young women who have been best friends since their early years at the local public school; a Sunni Muslim of Palestinian origin, and a Shia Muslim of Kurdish-Iranian origin. We see the former with her daughter, who is then kidnapped. We follow the latter to Dubai to meet her love, and to Iran to visit family. By necessity, the film reveals and conceals simultaneously, as the young women prefer to leave things ambivalent for good reasons. The movement – harakat – of the young women dictates the form of the film. All of their performances and surfaces are treated as equally true, real, and contextual – as aspects of the person and the interaction.

18:00
Summer School
Directed by: Ioanna Papadatou, Cécile Flipo, Nikki Geelen, Sophie Cowling. 11' (Greece)

At first glance, it might seem to be yet another traditional coffee-house in Athens; however, if you look closely through the glass windows, you will notice its customers deeply focussed on the game of chess. Panellinion is a place with a long history and nostalgia in every corner. Here, different people from different socioeconomic backgrounds gather to rest after work, socialise, but more importantly, practice their passion, chess. A regular, named Ilias, states that when you play chess, your mind empties and you exist only for the game. In this short anthropological documentary, performativity unveils a dialogue between concepts like time and space, power, gender, tradition and underlying tension between being together and alone.

18:00
Summer School
Directed by: Konstantina Koultouki, Sofia Panagiotakou, Valentina Massone. 12' (Greece)

Death. The ultimate frontier, the final incognito, the most visceral fear. Since the beginning of time, humanity has been wondering, questioning and most importantly dealing with the unbearably abstract nature of this concept. Set in the First Cemetery of Athens, following the Greek Orthodox ritual from the ceremony to the burial, from the exhumation to the ossuary, this movie takes the perspective of the workers in that contributes to its physical manifestation. Walking the subtle line between production and consumption, eternal and ephemeral, extraordinary and mundane, Among the living uses an anthropological, deeply sensorial approach to question perception, perspectives and meaning making processes, while quietly celebrating the vibrancy of life around death.

18:00
Summer School
Directed by: Anne Lisa Mudde, Elli Siora, Emma Harris, Lotte van der Woude. 11' (Greece)

The ethnographic film Praxi follows a group of young Greek aspiring actors, determined to follow their dream. Every day, they come together in order to prepare themselves for the theatre school’s entry exam. For hours at a time, they listen to each other’s’ monologues, encourage each other to sing or they practice how they can free fall without getting hurt. Praxi focuses on several individuals to trace the shape and diversity of the greater group. They reflect on what theatre means to them. How do these lessons help them to grow as actors but also as people? And to what extent does the theatre provide them with a free space for self-expression?

18:00
Summer School
Directed by: Diane Agatha, Despoina Kalogianni, Kitty Ka Wai Chan. 10' (Greece)

The documentary followed three girls who were volunteering in the Catholic NGO called “Heart Home” in Athens, Greece. Alongside the daily religious practices, the three girls, Adele, Klaudia and Roky, aimed to serve the people who are suffering, lonely and poor, such as homeless people and refugee kids. With different personal background, they reflected upon their relations with the people they served. Through engaging in the Catholic movement, they hoped to bring presence and compassion to these people in order to show the caring and love little by little. Such culture of compassion, to serve the people wholeheartedly, intertwined with their spiritual life, eventually leading to their contemplation of the real presence of the God.

18:00
Summer School
Directed by: Fidelia S. Ametewee, Camille Giraut, Sofia Poulia. 10' (Greece)

This film, Sensational African Collection is about two African hair salons in Athens, Greece. After sharing different ideas and point of views on the theoretical and ethical questions of cultural appropriation, the film shifted focus to the aesthetics of the African hairstyles and the interaction between customers and their hairdressers. It explores the interrelations between individuals and the atmosphere in these female spaces; the film also shows one dimension of female labour migration in Athens. The film incorporated experimental shots and observations on the ordinary and daily lifestyles of women in the hair salons.

19:30
Panorama
Directed by: Mattijs van de Port. 71' (The Netherlands)

Shot in Bahia, Brazil, The Possibility of Spirits is an essay film on the mystery of spirit-possession. Images of possession ceremonies first and foremost reveal that we don’t know what it is that we are looking at. Words are allowed to drift out of meaning. Trying to grasp the phenomenon, they become silence, or laughter, or screaming. Paying tribute to the extra-ordinariness of its subject matter, this film invites viewers to allow themselves to be confused and -in that confusion- consider the possibility of spirits.

21:15
Panorama
Directed by: Cláudia Varejão. 112' (Japan, Switzerland, Portugal)

A dive, the noon sunlight cuts through the water. The air on both lungs will have to be enough to rip the abalone from the rocks in the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. With no aid from air tanks or any other tools to enable underwater breathing, the body as a whole is summoned to its limit. In Wagu, a fishing village in the Ise Peninsula, Matsumi, Mayumi and Masumi dive everyday not knowing what they’ll find. Underwater, their delicate bodies turn into those of sea hunters. The Ama-San have been diving like this in Japan for over 2000 years.

23:15
Panorama
Directed by: Philip Cartelli. 31' (France, ΗΠΑ)

A reflection on the near and the far, the past and present, Promenade observes a series of movements and interactions on a renovated section of the Marseille waterfront. Recorded during two years, the film depicts the new life of a commercial shipping pier recently converted into a public esplanade and the site of two imposing modern buildings over the course of a single day. Before daybreak, the space is nearly empty. Sunrise prompts a start to daily activities—boats arrive, fishermen cast out their lines, the first timid tourists line up outside of a new museum. During the day, a cast of itinerant vendors, swimmers, fishermen, and other locals circle around the J4’s new visitors and buildings, eventually reclaiming the space at night.

23:15
Man and the Environment
Directed by: Julia Yezbick. 27' (ΗΠΑ)

How to Rust is a postindustrial fable told in iron, rocks, and wood. It takes as its starting point an installation built out of repurposed materials that spans several vacant lots alongside Ford Freeway in Detroit, Michigan. The installation, “Iron Teaching Rocks How to Rust” is the work of storyteller Olayami Dabls which he fashions as a metaphor for the forced assimilation of Africans to European culture and language. Here Dabls’ appropriation of the postindustrial landscape becomes a commentary on the half-life of Fordism, where the relationship between cultural production, history, and place is being forged anew, revealing larger truths about how we mythologize a former glory and shape an imagined future.

23:15
Man and the Environment
Directed by: Guilherme Moura. 20' (Brazil)

A sensorial record of the affinity´s relations with the fire in the conservation of the Cerrado (Brazilian savannah). In the company of locals hired to act as “fire rangers” and, more recently, as “management agents”, the film explores the effects of fire beyond the discursive dimension. In addition to portraying the fight against wildfires and fire-against-fire, the short film provides another portrait of the fire, in which the fire itself is portrayed as an other. In this way, the cinematographic experiment points to a “more than human” film anthropology, in which environmental forces such as heat, vegetation, wind and humans form a tension between the uncertainty and the control.

25/11Saturday
17:30
Filming Labour and Precarity
Directed by: Apostolos Karakasis. 91' (Greece)

When the Greek factory of VIO.ME. closes down, a group of workers decides to take radical action. They occupy the facilities and decide to operate the factory themselves, through a model of direct democracy. Their attempt inspires activists from all around the world, while the previous owner is surprised to see the family business turning into a symbol for the up-and-coming radical left. The workers, striving to make their plan sustainable, realize that selfmanagement is an adventurous process full of tensions that will finally alter themselves.

19:15
Man and the Environment
Directed by: Molly Willows. 24' (Thailand, Μιανμάρ)

Τhis lyrical short documentary featuring a captivating community of indigenous stateless Moken sea nomads who live off the coast of Burma and Thailand. Today living as a ragtag community of ocean-frolicking outliers, the vibrant community fully survived the Boxing Day Tsunami ten years ago. This poetic film explores their disappearing aquatic lifestyle and shifting spirituality largely due to Christian missionaries who arrived to “save” the Moken after the fatal wave. The film’s intimate moments induce awe, as well as reflections about broader contemporary issues like globalisation, modern-day religiosity, and our fragile environment. The film carries the audience away to some magical place, where certainty and hope melt with the burning sun, yet never fully cease.

19:15
Man and the Environment
Directed by: Loukas Koubouris, Nickolas Papadimitriou. 30' (Greece)

For centuries, the lagoon of Mesologgi-Aitoliko supplies with food and gives work to a large part of the local population, forming a unique natural and cultural landscape. The film is an effort to document the daily life of the fishermen at the Komma “ivari”, through their labour and their relationship with the unique space of the lagoon.

20:30
Panorama
Directed by: Isabelle Ingold. 55' (France)

This film traces out the portrait of a motorway rest area located in the countryside in the North of France. It looks like a dream, filled with the whispers thoughts and the lives of those who work here, as well as those who are just passing through. It is also a very concrete place, a perfect spot to observe today’s Europe, the violence carried by the free competition of a single market, the nostalgia carried by uprooted lives, and all the solitude engendered by our modern world.

22:00
Special Screenings
Directed by: John Marshall. 72' (ΗΠΑ)

Αn early classic in anthropological film follows the hunt of a giraffe by four men over a five-day period. The film was shot in 1952-53 on the third joint Smithsonian-Harvard Peabody sponsored Marshall family expedition to Africa to study Ju/’hoansi, one of the few surviving groups that lived by hunting – gathering. John Marshall was a young man when he made this, his first feature length film. He was a natural cameraman who found a subject that would dominate the rest of his life. He has since shot over 600,000 feet of film from which 24 films were edited. The value of the footage as an encyclopedia of !Kung life is unequaled by any other body of ethnographic film.

23:15
Panorama
Directed by: Jeff Silva, Vic Rawlings. 96' (ΗΠΑ)

An immersive meditation on the passage of time and the persistent resonance of place, Linefork follows the daily rituals of an elderly couple living in Kentucky’s Appalachian Mountains. Now well into his eighties, Lee Sexton is the last living link to the distant past of a regional American music. A retired coal miner with black lungs, Lee and his wife, Opal, continue to farm the land where he was born. Together they face encroaching health concerns and stark economic realities. Recorded over three years, Linefork is an observational film documenting their marriage, their community, their resilience, and the raw yet delicate music of an unheralded banjo legend, linked to the past yet immediately present.

26/11Sunday
15:30
Filming Labour and Precarity
Directed by: Chiara Ambrosio, Caterina Pasqualino. 64' (United Kingdom, France, Spain)

Τhe film explores the landscape of human resistance. Following the 2007 crisis, a group of neighbors in the working class area of Granada transformed a dumping ground at the edge of the city into a physical product of resistance. The orchard- located within a ravine 10km away from the mass graves of the Spanish civil war where Garcia Lorca was murdered- is a free space where marginalized people turn the earth every day: a place where there is order without politics and faith without religion. The film follows Antonio, Santiago and Oscar, three friends rooted deeply inside that soil from where they are able to re-imagine their lives and challenge the practical limitations of their social and historical circumstances.

15:30
Filming Labour and Precarity
Directed by: David Fedele. 20' (Australia, Γκάνα)

Have you ever wondered what happens to your electronics at the end of their life? Almost 50 million tonnes of e-waste (electronic waste) are generated worldwide every year. A large volume of second-hand and condemned electronic goods arrive in developing countries from the “developed” world, with a significant quantity arriving as e-waste, exported illegally as “second hand goods”. Without dialogue or narration, e-wasteland presents a visual portrait of unregulated e-waste recycling in Ghana, West Africa, where electronics are not seen for what they once were, but rather for what they have become.

16:15
Man and the Environment
Directed by: Sarah Pink, Nadia Astari. 40' (Australia)

Laundry Lives takes us into the usually invisible everyday worlds of five middle class Indonesians. As Indonesia grows into one of the worlds emerging economies and growing markets, this has hidden implications for the everyday lives of the country’s rapidly growing professional middle classes, and for environmental sustainability. Laundry Lives captures this moment, as changing gender relations, new technologies and concerns about the environment are becoming central to how domestic life is organised. Lia, Dyna, Ning, Adi and Nur show us how they, with their families and domestic helpers, navigate and improvise the complex relationships between their professional careers and ambitions and the mundane domestic chores and that underpin them.

16:15
Man and the Environment
Directed by: Hanna Kaihlanen. 14' (China)

Zhujinnong’s house is located in the mountains of Northwest-China where clouds run through the vast green valleys. He’s a shibi, the communicator between the Gods of nature and the community. Edge of the Clouds follows Zhujinnong’s struggle between Qiang culture and contemporary China. Somewhere between the mountain peak and the down below valley lies the ancient spirituality.

17:45
Greek Ethnographies
Directed by: Io Chaviara, Michalis Kastanidis. 26' (Greece)

In 2016, an old lady from Idomeni, a small greek village on the Greek-Macedonian border, remembers stories about locals who crossed the borderline and never came back. At the same time, the border is sealed closing the route to thousands of refugees trying to reach Northern Europe, and a settlement of 15.000 people has been built right next to the village. While the old lady’s narrations reconstruct the History of the border, some Palestinians from Syria living in the settlement, decide to set up a kindergarten instead of just passively wait for the border to open. In this way, they create relationships that allow them to exist in the present, to envision the future and to create conditions that bring them closer to a feeling of a home.

17:45
Greek Ethnographies
Directed by: Anna Wilma Xilakis. 49' (Greece)

In the winter of 2015 the world faced the biggest refugee crisis since WW II. People escaping war, persecution and poverty reached Idomeni, the Greek-FYROM border that became a symbol of Europe’s excluding character. The ethnographic film Going Illegal, a border Diary, an outcome of a politically engaged ethnographic research, depicts the crisis through the actions of a transnational activist network that was formed alongside local initiatives in response to Europe’s harshening Immigration policies. Aiming to help those rejected at the frontier, who often faced detention and deportation, the network advocated the right to freedom of movement as a fundamental human right, challenging notions such as legality, illegality, borders and nation- states.

17:45
Greek Ethnographies
Directed by: Ann-Kathrine Kværnø, Jack Ryan Jones. 22' (Greece)

The film follows two fishermen from the Greek village Skala Sikamineas, on the island of Lesvos, who were nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts in saving people crossing the waters from Turkey to Greece. Filmed during the period of relative calm, in May 2016, and structured around everyday practices of these two fishermen, the film explores their experiences of frequently rescuing those attempting to cross the same waters they navigate daily for their work. These memories are intertwined with an observational approach to contemporary fishing practices, exploring how previous experiences of rupture in daily life continue to inflect and give meaning to these fisherman’s relationship to the sea.

20:00
Panorama
Directed by: Angelos Rallis. 99' (Austria, Greece, Belgium)

In 2014, the Yezidi city of Shingal in northern Iraq was conquered by IS who kidnapped 3,000 women. In a deserted coal mine on the Turkish border, thousands of Yezidi refugees wait for a safe return. Through the eyes of an older man, a teenage boy and a family, the film Illustrates the burdens and dilemmas of this persecuted religious minority. Hanging around ruins and fishing pools, children discuss shockingly adult topics, such as the chances of another genocide taking place. Inconsolable, the Havind family talk on the phone with their daughter who reports from the slave camp. The suffering is made all the more palpable when the family visits their city of Shingal, which has been reduced to rubble.

22:00
Filming Labour and Precarity
Directed by: Olena Fedyuk. 52' (Ukraine, Ουγγαρία)

The film follows an annual 10-day- long walking Pilgrimage dedicated to and organized by Ukrainian labour migrants and their families. During 260 km of walk, the Pilgrims spread the word of their experiences abroad and try to reconnect with their families, estranged through the years of migration. They fight the guilt and the sense of blame for migration, and, against the evermore crumbling trust in the Ukrainian state, attempt to organize through the only existing for them institution, the Church. Τhe film speaks of the controversial rise of the Church institution in a post-soviet state, as a force preoccupied not only with the spiritual, but also with the social and the political.

22:00
Filming Labour and Precarity
Directed by: Elliot Spencer. 14' (China, Australia)

Long Yearning explores through sound and image the nature of repetitive work carried out by Chinese factory workers. China is known as the factory to the World and yet we rarely see up close the people who work there. “Long Yearning” takes the audience up close to the workers through intimate portraiture of them as they work. The sound and images create dreamlike atmosphere aimed to challenge the audience to look closer. The project combines traditional Chinese poetry from 14 Chinese poets, with excerpts chosen by the factory workers.

Media

The trailer for the 8th Ethnofest

Side Events

22/11Wednesday
23/11Thursday
10:00
School Screenings

24/11Friday
10:00
School Screenings

25/11Saturday
11:00-14:00
Panel discussion for the themed section “Labour and Precarity”

Panel discussion for the themed section “Labour and Precarity” and film screening. The curators Dimitra Kofti and Mao Mollona present questions and issues concerning this year’s themed section, and invite the filmmakers Jasmina Metwaly (“Out on the Street”) and Apostolos Karakasis (“Next Stop: Utopia”) to a discussion on, and beyond, their work.

The dicussion will be followed by the screening of the film:

“Out on the Street (Egypt, 2015, 70′)

Directed by: Jasmina Metwaly, Philip Rizk

On a rooftop overlooking the heart of Cairo -presented as a space between fact and fiction- nine working class men participate in an acting workshop where directors create characters and stories inspired by workers’ real lives.

15.00-17:00
Masterclass with Isabelle Ingold and Vivianne Perelmuter

Μasterclass on “Editing in documentary filmmaking” by award-winning film editor and filmmaker, Isabelle Ingold and her colleague, Vivianne Perelmuter.

26/11Sunday
13:00-15:00
Panel discussion: "Small places in the 21st century: Old challenges, new perspectives"

Panel discussion for the themed section “Man and the Environment”.

The curators of the section, Alexis Katsaros and Calliope Stara, invite the audience to an open discussion concerning the complex issues, among which preserving the environment and the changes in the rural and mountainous communities of Greece.

Participants in the discussion will be Sophia Ifanti and Vassilis Konstantinides (Residents of Thermos municipality and representatives of the Research, creativity and development institute of Thermos, Yiorgos Keranis (Vovousa Festival) and Yiorgos Makris (Artistic director of Zagoriwood).

The discussion will be coordinated by Villy Fotopoulou, Head of the Directorate of Modern Cultural Assets and Intangible Cultural Heritage.

The tribute entitled “Man and the Environment” is implemented by the Operational Program “Human Resources Development, Education and Lifelong Learning” and its co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund) and Greek National Funds. The film tribute has free admission and it’s accessible to disabled people.

Sponsors