Movies

After six successful editions and the respective steps forward they signified for the Festival, 2016 had the greatest step forward in store. Thanks to our sponsors’ kind support, our biggest dream finally came true: for the first time in its lifetime the Athens Ethnographic Film Festival moved its screenings to a cinema, thus ensuring the best screening conditions for its audience, as well as an ideal venue for socializing and networking. It was also the first time the films were subtitled in Greek, which meant that our audience grew larger and more diverse in ages and background. Last but not least, we were delighted to welcome several filmmakers who discussed their work with the audience.

 

From November 23rd to November 27th, the Astor cinema hosted the more than 50 films in this year’s line-up, offering a panoramic view of the recent world productions in the ethnographic film field and opening up windows with intriguing vistas of the world. Films from the US, Russia, Brazil, France, Tajikistan, Cyprus, Turkey and, of course, Greece, chronicled and analysed issues that address the everyday reality of people and groups all over the world, in a way that only visual anthropology can capture.

 

True to its educational mission, the Festival, with the support of the Division of Modern Cultural Assets and Intangible Cultural Heritage Division of the Ministry of Culture, inaugurated morning screenings for groups of schoolchildren. Our main goal was introducing the children to ethnographic film as a fresh way of approaching knowledge, as well as to the intangible cultural assets that are testimonials of the traditional, folk and intellectual culture. Noted anthropologist and filmmaker Anna Grimshaw as well as filmmaker-professor Alexandra Tilman also presented fascinating masterclasses on different theoretical and technical aspects of ethnographic film.

 

Robert Gardner’s masterpiece “Forest of Bliss” also held a special place in this year’s programme, as a special screening celebrating 30 years since its release, while this year’s tributed included the “Through Cyprus with the cinematic camera” themed section, curated by anthropologist Pafsanias Karathanasis and museologist Despo Pasia, and “Ethnographic Views on Gendered Roles in Society”, a series of screenings realized within the framework of the operational program “Public Sector Reform”, co-funded by the European Union and national resources.
The cinema filled to capacity, the lively post-screening chat, the encounters with festival regulars as well as new friends, the festival team growing larger and the Festival’s acceptance by the anthropological world and beyond give us the strength we need to continue making plans so that the Festival remains an important mark in the cultural map of Athens and Greece. See you next year!

The Division of the Modern Cultural Assets and Intangible Cultural Heritage of the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports is happy to be working again with the Athens Ethnographic Film Festival, a renowned organisation which screens and champions Greek and international ethnographic productions.

Our Division, which is responsible for the implementation of the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage, attempts to take initiatives and realise ideas in order to raise awareness among the citizens, primarily the young, when it comes to intangible cultural heritage as a key component of our cultural identity and the collective self-awareness in Greek society. To this end, we not only welcome, but also actively encourage the democratic and equal dialogue with the communities and entities that have to do with intangible cultural heritage. Ethnographic cinema, as a means to depict anthropological discourse making use of the power of the moving image, can be the perfect reason to not only get in touch with a different cultural experience, but to also look in the mirror -or, rather, the screen!- at our own selves.

We also aim to broaden the scientific conversation about the managing of the intangible cultural heritage in a rapidly changing world. This year’s tribute to the intangible cultural heritage at the Athens Ethnographic Film Festival was curated by social anthropologist Athina Peglidou, who happily accepted our proposal and whom we wholeheartedly thank.

This year, our partnership with Ethnofest includes pilot educational screenings of ethnographic documentaries to students of primary and secondary school students (November 24th and 25th, 2016). Realising this idea is for all of us here at the Division of the Modern Cultural Assets and Intangible Cultural Heritage of the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports an interesting challenge, since we think that connecting ethnographic cinema with education could prove to be valuable and extremely beneficial. Our ambition is to use ethnographic documentaries as a tool for introducing students to intangible cultural heritage, broadening their cultural education and waking them up to their role as active citizens. The moving image, which is so familiar to children, can also be crucial for their meeting of different cultural experiences, a revelation of a new way of approaching knowledge and interpretations of the world. For this reason we support and promoted partnerships that move towards this direction, we seek a substantial dialogue with the educational community and we hope to reinforce similar attempts in the future. We wish the Athens Ethnographic Film Festival the very best!

Villi Fotopoulou
Head of the Division of the Modern Cultural Assets and Intangible Cultural Heritage of the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports


The relationship between tangible and intangible cultural heritage and ethnographic film worked through a great quid pro quo, a mutual reciprocation. The scholars (historians, anthropologists, folklorists, museologists) demanded by the image specialists the specific certification of a visible proof that could give the reason for their occurrence, while filmmakers through their involvement with the cultural heritage accrued to the validity of a national or global mission and a idiotope, a registered location and the objects of vision. The collusion on the relationship between visible and real, appointed additional relations of inventory and archiving, preservation, authenticity, imitation and counterfeit, and multiplied these formalities-practices and cultural reality of management. I hope the films at the center of the Intangible Cultural Heritage section of the Athens Ethnographic Film Festival, “Unity Through Culture” (C.Suhr, T.Otto, 59min, 2011) and “A Celebration of Origins” (E. Douglas Lewis, T. Asch, P. Asch, 45 min, 1992) will be provide the basis for discussion and consideration regarding the belief in the autonomy of ritual practice and rouse “suspicions” as to the conditions of their production and reproduction.

Athena Peglidou

Through Cyprus with the Cinematic Camera

Cyprus presents us with an idiosyncratic case of a geographical, cultural and affective space. Often positioned on the fringe of the ‘East’ or the ‘West’, the Mediterranean as well as Europe, it is also a space where, due to its small size, social activity often acquires specific dynamics and manifestations. At the same time, contemporary Greece has developed a somewhat special relation to Cyprus, formulated mainly through affiliations with the Greek-Cypriot community and its perceptions of the Cyprus Problem. As a result, Greece often ignores the historical complexities and the multiplicity of contemporary reality of the country’s inhabitants. In putting together this year’s Themed Section of the Athens Ethnographic Film Festival our aim was thus to screen films and initiate discussions on certain aspects of the ‘familiar’ yet ‘distant’ Cyprus, which are still largely unknown to audiences in Greece.

Looking at this relationship from an anthropological perspective, it could be said that for Greece, Cyprus is a familiar Other. The notion of the familiar Other, which to a large extent we believe reflects contemporary social, cultural, even political relations between Cyprus and Greece, becomes particularly conspicuous when we consider language. Due to the fact that it is only superficially known in Greece, the Cypriot linguistic variety allows for the clear marking of some of the defining lines of familiarity and otherness between the two cultural spaces, while it also showcases the ethnographic aspect of the films included in the Themed Section.

The first visual renderings of Cyprus on the photographic and the cinematic film were imprinted with the colonial imagery of the place and its people. Subsequently, visuality about Cyprus followed various trajectories which did not always reflect social and historical changes: for example, up until the previous decade, the Cypriot experiences of modernity and post-modernity were almost banned from the country’s visual representations. For the title of this Themed Section, we appropriate and hybridise the title of the first extensive photographic rendering of Cyprus, produced by John Thompson and published under the title Through Cyprus with the Camera in the Autumn of 18781. By doing so, we aim to highlight the pivotal role of the colonial gaze in the process of creating the dominant cinematic construction of Cyprus. However, the Themed Section includes not only ethnographic films but also documentaries, fiction and video art in an attempt to investigate various cinematic genres and narratives, composed and articulated from the end of the colonial era, in 1960, to the present.

During the last five decades or so, the Cyprus Problem has obviously been centrally positioned within these cinematic narratives. Nonetheless, audiences of the Themed Section will see that we chose not to include films which position the Problem as their main or exclusive theme, since such films are characterised by what Constandinides and Papadakis call ‘the excess of the political’2: an excess, which more often than not, dominates narratives about Cyprus and which does more to preclude than facilitate an understanding of contemporary Cypriot society. Although these films form perhaps the largest part of cinematic production in Cyprus, we attempt to highlight films which either acquire alternative starting points in their approach to the Problem, thus looking awry at and through it, or incorporate it within other thematic scopes in ‘atypical’ ways. In this way, we are able to respond to a growing movement within Cypriot society, which seeks referents beyond the Cyprus Problem, and is evident in areas beyond the cinematic and the photographic, such as the visual arts, playwriting, literature and music.

A related issue which preoccupied us extensively in the process of putting together this Themed Section is the presence of the Turkish-Cypriot community both in front and behind the camera. Although the issue emerges all the more intensely within Cyprus, dominant narratives about the country, and particularly those which reach Greece, continue to present primarily Greek-Cypriot perceptions of the society on the north side of the dividing line. Contrary to our aspirations and our efforts, which were geared towards including more films from and about the north part of the country, the rather restricted production as well as technical difficulties limited our choices. We do however want to point out that cinematic production on the Turkish-Cypriot community and the north part of Cyprus is on the rise. Examples of this growing trend are included in this Section.

An equally important issue is the cultural diversity of Cyprus, which has been a historically prominent characteristic of the island, as well as the linking of this cultural plurality to the issue of present-day migrant realities and trajectories. The growing engagement with migrant communities in Cyprus is captured in a number of films, especially those originating from the south part of the country, thus forming another cinematic trend included in the Section.

Aware of our task as curators of the special Themed Section of the Ethnographic Film Festival of Athens, we aimed to prioritise those films which approach issues such as the above through the lens of the everyday. In other words, films which, adopt an ethnographic gaze even if they haven’t been made by anthropologists.

Pafsanias Karathanasis, Social anthropologist
Despo Pasia, Museologist – Museum Educator

 

John Thompson 1985 [1879]. Through Cyprus with the Camera in the Autumn of 1878. (London: Trigraph)
Costas Constandinides & Yiannis Papadakis (eds.). 2014. Cypriot Cinemas: Memory, Conflict and Identity in the Margins of Europe. New York & London: Bloomsbury.

The “Ethnographic Views on Gendered Roles in Society” section is realised within the framework of the Operational Program “Public Sector Reform” and is co-funded by the European Union (European Social Fund) and national resources.

%ce%b5%cf%83%cf%80%ce%b1

For this section, we also invited the Centre for Gender Studies (Panteion University, School of Political Sciences,Department of Social Policy) to take part in the screenings. The post-graduate students Aliki Theodosiou, Melina Klafanti and Athena Papanagiotou will be introducing the films, with Carolin Phillip acting as co-ordinator. All of the screenings are free of charge.

Program

23/11Wednesday
20:00
Student Films
Directed by: Anne-Katrine Hansen, Janna Kyllästinen. 13' (U.S.A.)

“Division Avenue” is a short documentary film about one of the most prominent, yet often ignored landmarks of New York, the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway. Build on fieldwork in the neighborhood of Los Sures, Williamsburg, the film revolves around urban planning and the historical impact of the highway construction on the neighborhood. The film examines the architecture and fabric of the BQE through poetic imagery and experimental ambient sound recordings that present the constant presence of the expressway. In varied, personal and impersonal imagery of the road and people alongside it –at times haunting and hallucinatory, hypnotic and dreamlike – it invites the audience to encounter urban landscape in a unique and curious way.

Student Films
Directed by: Jessica Bollag. 49’ (Switzerland)

The state of Iowa is the largest producer of soy and corn in the U.S.. In the town of Eldon, Iowa, the multi-national corporations, Cargill and John Deere, are the most important job sources – mostly in the low income bracket. In the town there are hardly any public services and houses are miles apart. Five young people talk about their daily lives in this rural area. Layoffs and outsourcing are real threats. Beside all this, the protagonists are labeled with negative stereotypes: white trash, rednecks and hillbillies. The five inhabitants of Eldon describe the local changes. Why stay despite bad job opportunities? How do they deal with their negative stereotypes? Why is freedom more important than a career? Creative solutions and a strong sense of community are essential in this rural region. An anthropological documentary about unlocked doors, fun and conflict in geographical isolation.

24/11Thursday
16:30
Through Cyprus with the Cinematic Camera
Directed by: Marios Piperides. 14' (Cyprus)

Cyprus, 2014. Yiannis is desperately trying to find a way to change his monotonous life and break out of his uninspiring office job. He dreams of starting his own business. When the opportunity finally arises he is faced with a dilemma…

16:30
Through Cyprus with the Cinematic Camera
Directed by: Orestis Lambrou. 8' (Cyprus)

A look at the city through the eyes of one of its drifters. Kokos’ daily routine walk offers a structure to the film, which in turn offers us, the observer, a unique insight both into the world of Kokos as well as the city of Nicosia its self. We follow this urban nomad through Nicosia, observing his relationship with the city. Ten years after it was shot, the film has a secondary function of documenting the streets and buildings of Nicosia. Buildings that no longer exist, like the Nicosia general hospital, to entire streets that have now been demolished.

16:30
Through Cyprus with the Cinematic Camera
Directed by: Phanos Kyriacou. 11' (Cyprus)

The Sweethearts and the Dragon: A traditional custom, three sisters and a dragon.

16:30
Through Cyprus with the Cinematic Camera
Directed by: Soteris Christou. 8' (Cyprus)

Two men fighting over a parking spot. After a series of confrontations, the two neighbors are interrupted by greater forces.

16:30
Through Cyprus with the Cinematic Camera
Directed by: Yiannis Zouris. 20' (Cyprus)

A young Cypriot named Polis commutes to a village in order to finish the building of a small construction in the backyard of a small house. During the time of his stay, Polis will relate with the owner, Mr. Andreas, in unexpected ways. Due to a series of incidents Polis is introduced to new knowledge and perceptions that will eventually help him to realize and claim his conditions of existence. Just like the film in itself, Polis is moving on equilibrium between reality and fiction and between allegory and literality. The Coop, beyond its identity as a recording of Cyprus’ temporal and spatial contemporary realities, is an idiosyncratic attempt to approach the islands’ historical movement.

17:45
Ethnographic Views on Gendered Roles in Society
Directed by: Tanja Wol Sorensen. 27 mins (United Kingdom)

There are more than 500,000 domestic workers living in Spain today. The large majority are migrant women from Latin American countries. Through the stories of three Latin American women living in Barcelona, we get an insight into the reality of being a migrant woman and a domestic worker in Spain today. Through their own words, we learn about their motivations for crossing oceans to live in Catalonia, and why they choose to keep living outside of their native country. Despite the discrimination and abuse they experience, these women are actively trying to improve the rights and conditions for themselves and for others.

17:45
Ethnographic Views on Gendered Roles in Society
Directed by: Katerina Zoula. 30' (U.S.A.)

Against a backdrop usually seen on a holiday brochure, “Beneath the Tide” takes us straight into the rich lives of real people in the exotic land of Zanzibar. Pivotal to their story lies a plant usually overlooked… seaweed. Wanu, a fun loving woman in a coastal village in Zanzibar, Dr Flower, a respected local marine biologist and Klaartje, a business woman from the Netherlands are all connected by this precious ‘weed’ and their reality is filled with more conflict than you would think. The film goes behind the surface of this tropical paradise to bring us a story about women empowerment, and seaweed.

19:00
Through Cyprus with the Cinematic Camera
Directed by: Orhan Eskiköy. 75’ (Turkey)

63-year-old Arif Salih Kırdağ is a nationalist politician. His main goal is to preserve the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus established with the support of Turkey. He ran for mayor, deputy and president 12 times and never succeeded in getting elected. He strongly believes that he will succeed the 13th time he runs as a president candidate. The basis of his belief is mainly the interest in his campaign on Facebook and Twitter. The election campaign videos he uploads on the Internet are watched by thousands of people and he is certain that the youth especially will support him, not being aware that this interest is in fact a mockery. His dream is to become a politician like Recep Tayyip Erdogan since he is strongly impressed by Erdogan’s power.

20:45
Panorama
Directed by: Konstantina Bousmpoura, Julia Martinez Heimann. 76' (Argentina)

In Buenos Aires a group of acclaimed dancers create the first Contemporary National Company of Dance under their collective leadership. This is the story of four talented dancers, Ernesto, Bettina, Victoria and Pablo, along six years of their journey. They expose their dreams and contradictions as dancers, individuals and members of a Company that is founded on collective decision-making. We follow their lives, we attend their rehearsals and performances in the emblematic National Library building as well as their premiere and backstage in the historical National Theatre of Cervantes. We observe the fulfillment of the entire dance community’s biggest dream: the public demand for a National Dance Law.

22:30
Panorama
Directed by: Matteo Saltalippi, Greca Campus. 43' (Italy)

“Biographies of Struggle” is a documentary analysing the longest steelworkers strike in Italy since the last labour unrest wave of the 80s. The Terni ThyssenKrupp factory threatened by 550 job cuts and a partial closure is the framework where 11 participants express their discordant thoughts and opinions about the on-going 7 months dispute and 45-days- long strike. Drawing on their biographies and work experiences, the protagonists depict a fragmented portrait of one of the oldest Italian working class communities, while defending the local labour from the multinational’s capitalistic profit logic. The film combines the participants’ footage and the anthropologist’s participant observation in order to create a visual representation of the workers’ community, their rituals and “passages” during the unfolding dispute aimed to defend their jobs, while questioning their working history and constructed identities.

22:30
Panorama
Directed by: Martin Gruber. 44' (Germany)

“Gbaya – Beekeeping and Honey Hunting” depicts different activities related to traditional beekeeping and honey hunting as practiced amongst the Gbaya in the area of Ngaoundere, Central Cameroon. The film first shows the highly sophisticated construction of a traditional hive by a beekeeper, who later demonstrates the harvest of honey from such a hive in a savannah habitat. The same beekeeper then demonstrates the practise of honey hunting.

25/11Friday
17:15
Ethnographic Views on Gendered Roles in Society
Directed by: Elise Laker. 20 mins (United Kingdom, Tajikistan)

With many families in Tajikistan increasingly turning to migration as an answer to their financial hardship, “Behind the Wheel” serves as an inquiry into the challenges this phenomenon can present for those who stay behind. It explores the moral and emotional turmoil of Nigora, an Uzbek woman whose traditional life of being a housewife is turned upside down after her migrant husband fails to send back enough money and she finds out he has been having an affair. No longer able to rely on her husband, Nigora defies prevailing gender norms and sets to work fixing car tyres.

17:15
Ethnographic Views on Gendered Roles in Society
Directed by: Edouard Mills-Affif. 63' (France)

A tragedy is playing out in a village in the Nile Delta. Heba loves Ahmed, to whom she has been engaged for three years. But one day, she finds herself betrothed to a stranger. Her uncle, who lives in France, returns and tries to intervene, violently slamming into a brick wall of tradition, family ambitions, rigid social conventions and a general air of resignation. Filmed in 2013 while Egypt was led by the Muslim Brotherhood, La fiancée du Nil is a direct and wrenching descent into a personal tragedy experienced by so many young women today and the deep confusion of an Egypt in crisis.

19:00
Ethnographic Views on Gendered Roles in Society
Directed by: Adele Tulli. 25 mins (United Kingdom)

“Menopause is when a woman’s life begins!” The 85-year-old Therese Clerc is a militant feminist whose passion for politics and women’s rights has driven her life. The Baba Yaga House, an innovative co-housing project for women over 65, is the latest of her many projects to empower women. “Rebel Menopause” is the intimate portrait of an extraordinary woman and her inspiring ideas on ageing as a ‘time of complete freedom’, presenting a character that resists and overturns the common assumptions, while asserting her creativity and joie de vivre. It, thus, explores issues of sexuality, political involvement, housing and economic independence in older women’s lives, as well as their relationship with the ageing body in a society obsessed with a youthful appearance.

19:00
Ethnographic Views on Gendered Roles in Society
Directed by: Azra Rashid. 54' (Canada)

A look at genocide, survival, and physical and cultural continuity through the eyes of three women who have experienced three different genocides of the 20th century. Shot on location in Canada, Poland, Bangladesh and Rwanda, “A Woman’s Story” features three strong women who are connected by the thread of survival. Each one becomes aware of the story of the other and they become more determined to continue their essential duty. By putting women at the front and center of the narrative and transcending their victimization, this film highlights their resilience and survival.

20:45
Panorama
Directed by: Anna Grimshaw. 63' (U.S.A.)

Every day, carrying the simplest of tools, diggers across coastal Maine set out at low tide to dig for clams on the wide, mud flats that stretch far into the bay.  It is backbreaking work.  But it has an unusual beauty emanating from the ebb and flow of the tide, the shifts of light and wind, the skill and rhythm of digging, and the sound and texture of deep, viscous mud.  ”At Low Tide” evokes the sensory richness and poetic nature of clamming.

22:00
Student Films
Directed by: Qihui Wu. 18' (U.S.A.)

Responding to racism and historical erasure, the African diaspora has developed a multitude of tactics for mitigating the oppressive ideological conditions, such as advocating self-sufficiency and race pride. Among them, the Hebrew Israelite church identifies the African diaspora as the lineal descendants of ancient Israelites, because they believe that the enslavement of ancient Israelites in Egypt prophesies the Atlantic slave trade. Through the daily activity of the churchgoers in a Hebrew Israelite church, The Israel of God, in the south side of Chicago, the film “Chosen People” provides a poignant and subtle mediation on relations among history, memory and identity.

22:00
Student Films
Directed by: Fernando González Mitjáns. 40' (United Kingdom, Brazil, Colombia)

Before professors and students arrive for their morning classes, these are the people finishing work. Fleeing the social and political instability of their home countries, many Latin Americans come to London looking for work opportunities and a safe environment to raise and educate their children. In turn, they are confronted with discrimination, labour exploitation and social “invisibility”. After more than eight years of campaigning, the immigrant cleaners outsourced at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in London continue to demand being brought in-house. “Limpiadores” charts the history of their and others’ campaign – from winning the London Living Wage to the deportation of nine colleagues, and the day-to- day invisible labour of cleaners on campus.

22:00
Student Films
Directed by: Dorothea Braun. 30' (Italy)

Brenner/Brennero: an ancient village on an ancient path between north and south embodies in its geography the opposing desires between those who are passing by and those who are forced to stay. Stuck between an outsized shopping mall, forested mountains and windy highways, this shrinking, lost village on the invisible borderline between Italy and Austria seems facing an eternal time of change and elusiveness. This strong influence of changing, the violence of the surrounding nature and the passing of male passengers are constantly shaping this place’s aura of absurdity and sadness.

23:30
Intangible Cultural Heritage
Directed by: Thanassis Papakostas. 11' (Greece)

“Rembetiko” is a Ministry of Culture & Sports production, realised for the documentation of this musical genre’s nomination folder for the UNESCO Catalogue of Representative Works (Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage, UNESCO, 2003). The film is a short story about the ways in which rembetiko, 100 years after it first appeared, remains popular both in Greece and abroad, particularly among the young. It attempts to depict its oral dissemination from the last representatives of the previous generation to the younger musicians, as well as the systematic teaching of it in music schools and universities.

23:30
Intangible Cultural Heritage
Directed by: Quino Piñero. 69' (United Kingdom, Spain, Ethiopia)

“It was an era, the start of a new vision” says Amha Eshete, the first Ethiopian music producer back in the days of Swingin’ Addis. The album releases that have crossed Ethiopian borders are mainly recordings from the 50s to the 80s, however, the contemporary music scene from Addis remains, bar a few exceptions, unknown to the rest of the world. Is Addis still swinging as it used to? Music in Addis is present in actions and sounds spread out on differentiated spaces as an expression of the everyday urban life and its processes of transformation and adaptation in the city. “New Voices in an Old Flower” explores this vitality of music looking at the plurality of the city and its people. Drifting in unplanned tours through the urban landscape of contemporary Addis Ababa, this film is shaped by music encounters and dialogues with the inhabitants of the city.

26/11Saturday
16:00
Through Cyprus with the Cinematic Camera
Directed by: Iva Radivojevic. 73' (U.S.A., Cyprus)

An essay in five parts, Evaporating Borders offers a series of vignettes, poetically guided by filmmaker Iva Radivojevic’s curious eye and personal reflections. Through the people she encounters along the way, the film dissects the experience of asylum seekers in Cyprus: a PLO activist and exile from Iraq is denied asylum within 15 minutes; neo-nazi fundamentalists roam the streets in an attack on Muslim migrants; activists and academics organize an antifascist rally and clash with the neo-nazis; 195 migrants drown in the Mediterranean. Originally from Yugoslavia and an immigrant to Cyprus, the director investigates the effects of large-scale immigration on the sense of national identity in one of the easiest ports of entry into Fortress Europe, passionately weaving the themes of migration, tolerance, identity and belonging.

17:30
Summer School
Directed by: Stefani Giakoumatou, Merve Cagsirli, Joukje Krol. ()

Floisvos Park is located at a six-kilometer distance from the city center of Athens, near the sea. The park is a unique cityscape of Athens, because of its location and diversity in visitors and activities. However, the area is changing rapidly; the park is an important and free area in the middle of public real estate projects. Throughout the film, the many dynamics of Floisvos Park become visible. Τhree main characters tell what the park means to them and about the changes it is going through. How do residents and visitors feel about the park? What was the situation of the park in previous years? Can borders exist in a public space?

17:30
Summer School
Directed by: Eirini Katsenou, Vera Van Rossum, Lore Janssens. ()

On the outskirts of Gazi, eight women have created a café bar open to anyone and bereft of any hierarchies. Faced with economic setbacks, the women set up the Beaver Collectiva in 2013. The space not only provides economic security for them, but also a secure place for those who “fall outside the norm”. Owners, customers and space interact to create a sense of intimacy that allows everyone to “belong”. The film is a portrait of the Beaver women and the remarkable space that they have created. Theirs is a story of economic precarity, ownership and activism in modern Greece.

17:30
Summer School
Directed by: Neoklis Mantas, Maaike Van Nus, Sergio Romo-Herrero. ()

Since 1886, Varvakios Agora has been the Central Food Market of Athens situated between Omonoia and Monastiraki area. It is considered to be the Stomach of Athens, able to reflect the quality of life of its citizens. The film focuses on the anthropology of senses and the interactions that are occurring during the summer opening hours of the Market. The film is also an attempt of visualizing the sensory experience of the people working, shopping and eating inside Varvakios during July 2016, while the heat wave and Crisis could be alluded.

17:30
Summer School
Directed by: Filippos Papazoglou, Laura Stauth, Ezli Suitela. ()

Michalis is working on the streets selling “ΣΧΕΔΙΑ” and lives in a shelter with friends. This is not a portrait of a man. This is a “portrait” of his life, of his routine. Understanding this routine enables us to come in touch with people who we might oversee many times, while we are walking. Their struggles don’t only concern their food or the necessity of a home, but also their need of not being overlooked – the desire of being a member of a community and not being ostracized. They are the eyes and ears of a city, even though people tend to ignore them. Michalis was able to talk to us about his feelings, his life and his perception of his world. It’s not a biography of a man, but a “biography” of a city through a different perspective, where less is home.

17:30
Summer School
Directed by: Constantinos Diamantis, Renate Klijnstra, Brittte Van Meurs. ()

The stage of this movie is Line 1, the oldest metro line in Athens, running since 1901. The line goes from Piraeus to Kifissia and back in approximately 60 minutes. Taking the metro is an everyday experience that changes per person, per routine, and per hour of the day. Daily life on public transport is as an entire city on the move; carrying the social personality of the city which speaks through the metro.

17:30
Summer School
Directed by: Konstantinos Tsaras, Yagmur Kocak, Leopold Helbich. ()

On May 22nd, 2016, activists and refugees took over the abandoned Hotel City Plaza in the centre of Athens. As a reaction against the EU-Turkey deal, which was passed exactly one month earlier, they established a community where refugees can live in a self-organized manner. City Plaza is now the home of more than 400 people, most of which are stuck in political and physical limbo in Greece due to the Dublin agreement and the EU-Turkey deal. City Plaza does not collaborate with the state or NGO’s. It is supported by various grass-root solidarity movements throughout Greece and Europe. The outspoken aim of the community is to provide an example to the authorities on how basic-democratic organization can work on an all-inclusive and non-hierarchical level.

18:45
Intangible Cultural Heritage
Directed by: Christian Suhr, Ton Otto. 59' (Australia, Denmark, Papua New Guinea)

Soanin Kilangit is determined to unite the people and attract international tourism through the revival of culture on Baluan Island in the South Pacific. He organizes the largest cultural festival ever held on the island, but some traditional leaders argue that Baluan never had culture and that culture comes from the white man and is now destroying their old tradition. Others, however, take the festival as a welcome opportunity to revolt against ’70 years of cultural oppression’ by Christianity. A struggle to define the past, present and future of Baluan culture erupts to the sound of thundering log drum rhythms.

18:45
Intangible Cultural Heritage
Directed by: E. Douglas Lewis, Patsy Asch, Timothy Asch. 45' (Australia)

The people of the Tana ‘Ai region of Flores, Indonesia live in seven ceremonial domains, of which Wai Brama is the largest and the oldest. The people of Wai Brama are shifting cultivators, hunters and gatherers who, unlike their neighbors, have maintained their traditional ceremonial and social system. “A Celebration of Origins”, filmed in 1980, depicts the first celebration of these rituals since 1960. The rituals, which require the participation of the entire community, had been delayed by poor harvests and epidemics. The film focuses on a small group of ritual leaders who struggle to hold the celebration in the absence of the Source of the Domain, the ritual leader of the community, who died after initiating the rituals.

21:00
Special Screenings
Directed by: Alexandra Tilman. 38' (France)

From singular to plural, from a father to his son, from a factory to laid-off workers, cadences are different from those of the fathers’ work or the sons’ music. Le Havre in the 1990s: decadence lies in the job market, outrageousness comes from techno music, free parties materialize in every deserted place. “Cadences” tells the story of the son of a steel worker who has decided not to follow his father’s path but rather to embrace the clandestine techno movement called ‘Free Parties’. This film, which was made in the frame, intention and context of socio-anthropological research, is an example of the emerging field in France of Filmic-Sociology.

22:00
Special Screenings
Directed by: Robert Gardner. 90' (U.S.A.)

When one watches “Forest of Bliss” for the first time, they’re likely to encounter what has often been described as a sensual and intellectual surprise. This film, which depicts a day in the life of the city of Varanasi, largely focusing on ritual and religion, provides a synesthetic viewing experience which comprises of sights and sounds of the city – but no dialogue, commentary or narration whatsoever. No other film within the contemporary anthropological world has generated the resonance and debate that “Forest of Bliss” has. The response at that time was overwhelming; the academic debate has at large revitalized the discipline of visual anthropology, and the film itself has been essentially a paradigm shift in ethnographic filmmaking and has inspired numerous filmmakers across genres and disciplines. It has been thirty years since Gardner’s masterpiece was released and it is our conviction that the film has lost nothing of its aesthetic brilliance or intellectual rigor. On the contrary, considering this work under the light of our lengthy and in-depth professional experience in ethnographic film, we maintain that only now we can properly evaluate and acknowledge the immense influence that this film has had on the history of ethnographic film, the theory of visual anthropology and documentary filmmaking ever since.

23:45
Student Films
Directed by: Ivan Golovnev. 25’ (Russia)

The history of ethnographic cinema in Russia is full of great names, heroic pathways, and classic films. The pioneers of the genre –the ethnographer Vladimir Arsenyev and the filmmaker Aleksandr  Litvinov– made a series
 of films about peoples of the Far East in the 1920–30s (“Forest People”, “Tumgu”, “Chzou”, etc.). The “Land of Udehe” filmed in the places of Arsenyev’s and Litvinov’s cinematic expeditions 80 years later. This film, as the modern cine-research of the traditional culture of Udehe, takes us into the spiritual world of this ethnic community/indigenous people of the Far East of Russia. According to the census of 2010, their population dropped to 1,490 souls…

23:45
Panorama
Directed by: Kostas Chritis. 26' (Greece)

Kathmandu, Nepal. Six months before a devastating earthquake, we see animals and humans hemmed in by the cityscape. On the same streets hundreds of thousands of sacrifices are made to the Gods with the approach of the religious festival of Dashain. The sacrificial flow of blood is halted at the National History Museum who “educate” the populace of the animal kingdom. While in a Buddhist monastery, a monk recites the Long Life Sutra to goats purposefully saved from the sacrificial knife. It is a prayer that will help the animals achieve a higher, human rebirth in the next life and ultimately liberation from samsara.

27/11Sunday
16:45
Through Cyprus with the Cinematic Camera
Directed by: Ahmad Albakri. 5' (Cyprus, Palestine)

The filmmaker tells his personal story towards defining freedom, a concept that is still obscure for over four million Palestinians living under the Israeli occupation. The story projects a surrealistic approach to showcase Northern Cyprus as an example to realize how simple surroundings can always connect Palestinians to the confinement of their reality. It is mainly a projection of an intense yearning for circumventing the constraints of occupation and breaking the manacles. Articulating this embedded desire for claiming a sense of freedom for Palestinians is akin to finding the missing piece in the puzzle of freedom, as Nelson Mandela once said: “We know too well that our freedom is incomplete without the freedom of the Palestinians.”

16:45
Through Cyprus with the Cinematic Camera
Directed by: Simon Bahceli. 22' (United Kingdom, Cyprus)

Even after 40 years, the Turkish Cypriot refugees struggle to feel at home in Morphou. Didem, born after ethnic partition, wants the town returned to its former Greek Cypriot inhabitants as a peace offering. Others, like the nationalist mayor- with his penchant for flags and modernization projects- vow to keep it forever.

16:45
Through Cyprus with the Cinematic Camera
Directed by: Keti Papadima. 14' (United Kingdom, Cyprus)

The water flows and breaks holy molds; it transforms a defined space into an inter-religious temple of solace: welcome to the ‘Water Church’, a tiny Orthodox Christian church in Lemesos, Cyprus, widely known for its well. Filled with what is believed to be holy water, it has become a place for rituals and prayers mostly among Buddhist migrants. The church reflects the longings and desires of its worshipers and becomes a link between a Cypriot elderly lady who takes care of the church and a Buddhist migrant worker, who shares her personal story. Against the water’s backdrop, religions blend and create peculiar new formations that respond to the familiar and embrace the adopted.

16:45
Through Cyprus with the Cinematic Camera
Directed by: Christiana Pyrishi. 21' (Cyprus)

“Crazy Old Ladies” is a short documentary about a group of Cypriot old ladies and their habit of playing cards together once a week. The film observes these five female friends who are well into their 70s and early 80s as they meet and play cards; a phenomenon that is very widespread in Cyprus and especially in their town, Limassol. Through the course of a single card game, we watch the interactions between them as well as hear their thoughts on why they have taken to this habit. The film touches upon the meaning of old age, and how that is experienced by the people in the film but also upon the importance of friendship in old age.

16:45
Through Cyprus with the Cinematic Camera
Directed by: Stephanos Papadas. 28' (Cyprus)

Stephanos Papadas (audiovisual artist), Andri Tsiouti (architect), Michalis Charalambous (visual artist) and Gorges Stylianou (audiovisual artist) collaborated on “Anamones”, a documentary which examines the sociological aspect of the rusty starter bars sticking out of the rooftops for “future use”. Though a majority of those bars never fulfill the initial purpose for which they were destined, their existence has been always taken for granted in a way that they go unnoticed nowadays. Their technical definition in Greek terminology [“anamones”/αναμονές] leads to questions related to family links and relationships within the small Cypriot society, where parents wish to ensure a future shelter for their children on top of their own house.

18.30
Ethnographic Views on Gendered Roles in Society
Directed by: Luciana Kaplan. 96' (Mexico)

A film about Eufrosina Cruz Mendoza, a native of Santa María Quiegolani, a small indigenous community nestled in the Southern Mountain Range in Oaxaca, Mexico. Eufrosina ran for town mayor of her community in 2007, but her victory was taken away just because she was a woman. That leads her on a personal crusade for gender equality in Oaxaca’s indigenous communities, questioning the current system and becoming an icon of social and gender indigenous fight in her State. This film is a portrait of Eufrosina’s personal journey and social awakening that dramatically changes as she accepts a position at the Oaxacan Chamber of Deputies.

20.15
Student Films
Directed by: Sarah Franzen. 20' (U.S.A.)

“Portrait of a Cooperative” documents the daily activities of one of the longest-running African American farmer cooperatives located in southern Mississippi, US. Building on the momentum of the Civil Rights Movement, this cooperative was formed as a means for farmers to collectively secure better prices and overcome racial discrimination.  Over the years, the cooperative has sustained many farmers and improved food access and economic development in the area. However, the survival of the cooperative is at risk, as family farming increasingly loses out to industrial agriculture, prompting younger generations to quit farming. This documentary short offers a sensory engagement with the practices and activities surrounding the cooperative, exploring how and why these farmers sustain their farming traditions.

20.15
Student Films
Directed by: Aylin Kuryel. 30' (The Netherlands, Turkey)

“Image Acts” explores the diffusion of nationalist ideas and fantasies in everyday life practices in Turkey at the end of 2000s. It consists of interviews with shop owners who sell products with national symbols on them, tattoo makers and people being tattooed with national symbols, people who live around the giant Atatürk statue in Izmir and people wearing the mask of the national leader. It investigates how people relate to and are affected by the images of the nation, which inevitably evolves into broader discussions of politics and personal stories. The examples of different performances of national identity, which at times conflict and at other times complement each other, depict a far from homogeneous picture of everyday nationalism in Turkey in the 2000s.

20.15
Student Films
Directed by: Ramona Sonderegger. 31' (Switzerland)

Mummy, mama and daddy; mummy, mama and sperm donor. The film “Extended Family” offers an intimate insight into two same-sex families’ lives, who found a way to create their families within a legal grey zone in Switzerland. Swiss law bans access to adoption and any assisted reproductive medicine for same-sex couples, therefore the portrayed families do not exist officially. Nevertheless, according to estimations, there are between 6.000 and 30.000 children living in rainbow families across the country. By including all the different involved family members, the film shows how connections and disconnections between them are being shaped and what kind of difficulties might arise if suddenly both partners have the ability to conceive a child.

21:45
Panorama
Directed by: Inês Ponte. 35' (United Kingdom, Portugal, Angola)

Set in the highlands village of Katuwo, the film is an intimate portrait of the day-to-day life of a family living in an agro-pastoralist farm in Namibe, Angola. Through the filmmaker’s request to her host, Madukilaxi, to put her skills into the making of a doll, the film addresses a twofold notion of labour taking place in the dry season: their shared doll-crafting and making a living. Lipuleni, Madukilaxi’s toddler, follows their twofold labour, and the three of them celebrate their efforts with a feast.

21:45
Panorama
Directed by: João Graça, Fábio Ribeiro. 74' (Mozambique)

The buildings are sprouting from the ground, the roads are feeding themselves from the neighborhood lots, the alleys of dirt become flooded with rainwater, people grow further apart, all in the name of progress. Maputo is a young African city emerging at the frenetic rhythm of the global financial demand. Some say it’s not meant for everyone. People from different backgrounds welcome us into their neighborhoods and help us see the real Maputo. Amongst them is Nhez, a wannabe rapper superstar that lives in the slums and waits for his chance in the spotlight. “Each man for himself”.

Media

ethnofestmedia

Download Media

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Side Events

23/11Wednesday
24/11Thursday
09:00
School screening

Screenings of selected ethnographic documentaries for primary and secondary school students in collaboration with the Division of the Modern Cultural Assets and Intangible Cultural Heritage of Ministry of Culture and Sports.

10:30
School screening

Screenings of selected ethnographic documentaries for primary and secondary school students in collaboration with the Division of the Modern Cultural Assets and Intangible Cultural Heritage of Ministry of Culture and Sports.

25/11Friday
9:00
School screening

Screenings of selected ethnographic documentaries for primary and secondary school students in collaboration with the Division of the Modern Cultural Assets and Intangible Cultural Heritage of Ministry of Culture and Sports.

10:30
School screening

Screenings of selected ethnographic documentaries for primary and secondary school students in collaboration with the Division of the Modern Cultural Assets and Intangible Cultural Heritage of Ministry of Culture and Sports.

14:00
"At Low Tide" - special screening for the participants of the masterclass

15:00
Masterclass with Anna Grimshaw

17:00
Event about Peter Loizos

Event about Peter Loizos at Spiti tis Kiprou (Ksenofontos 2A, Athens) in collaboration with the Social Anthropology and History Department of the University of the Aegean.

26/11Saturday
11:00
All-day event, part of the “Through Cyprus with the Movie Camera” themed section

14:00
"Cadences" - special screening for the participants of the masterclass with Alexandra Tilman

14:45
Masterclass with Alexandra Tilman

27/11Sunday

Sponsors

sponsors

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save